February 27, 2024
Historic Homes in Savannah

The city of Savannah has more than 300 antebellum buildings and more than 200 homes and mansions, many dating back to the early 1800s and even before that period. These historic buildings are an important part of what makes the city so special, and they also happen to make some of the most swoon-worthy spaces you’ll ever see! Whether you plan on visiting Savannah soon or you just want to know more about this beautiful city, this list of five of the most swoon-worthy historic homes in Savannah will get your heart racing!

1) City Hall

Built on the original site of a log building used as headquarters by James Edward Oglethorpe, this building served as the seat of local government from 1872 until 1934. Today City Hall houses various city offices including the mayor’s office and visitor center. Tours are offered Monday through Friday at 10:00 am, 12:00 pm, 2:00 pm, and 4:00 pm (tours are available to groups only on Saturdays). Admission is $3 for adults; $2 for children 6-12; free for children 5 or younger. The tours will give you an opportunity to see inside one of Savannah’s most historic buildings while learning about its rich history. Plus, admission tickets can be used as cash-less payment at any of the historic sites around town!

Vernon Square – Built-in 1875, Vernon Square was originally known as The Great Houses. These were two Victorian mansions that were home to some of Savannah’s wealthiest residents and members of America’s aristocracy. After many years of neglect and decay, these homes have been lovingly restored to their former glory. Now visitors are able to experience the lives of our ancestors with tours that include period furnishings, fine art collections, formal gardens, and full-length portrait galleries. The tour includes a visit to both homes–you’ll go through one house then walk across the street for your tour of the other.

2) Davenport House

Built in 1843 and preserved to its original splendor, the Davenport House is an example of Greek Revival architecture. The estate features wide hallways with high ceilings and large rooms that are beautifully decorated with lavish furnishings. Visitors can take a guided tour through the house and outbuildings, explore beautiful gardens and admire a museum-quality collection of antiques. The guides provide stories about life in 1860s Savannah at this luxurious home. Other historic homes you might want to see include Telfair Mansion (built in 1818), Owens-Thomas House (built in 1886) and Wardlaw -Caproni House (built in 1906). These homes will not disappoint!

3) Mercer House

When it comes to homes in Savannah, there are few as well-known and historically significant as the Mercer House. It is said that this home was built with 300 acres of forest surrounding it and it remains a hidden gem within the greater Savannah area. As the home features a two-story porch wrapped around three sides, it often provides beautiful views of the street below.

There are multiple balconies on both levels as well. Inside the house, you will find a formal sitting room, dining room, and library. The most iconic space inside is without question the grand ballroom which can seat up to 250 people! The family still maintains ownership of this historic site today.

Although some areas are not open to the public, visitors have been able to tour parts of the house including the gardens. Just across from River Street is another beautiful home known as Pitts’ Place. The Georgian-style exterior includes red brick walls and white columns lining either side of its large front entrance.

Visitors can take a guided tour through the house and outbuildings, explore beautiful gardens, and admire a museum-quality collection of antiques. The guides provide stories about life in 1860s Savannah at this luxurious home. Other historic homes you might want to see include Telfair Mansion (built-in 1818), Owens-Thomas House (built in 1886), and Wardlaw -Caproni House (built in 1906). These homes will not disappoint!

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